The London and Country Cook: or Accomplished Housewife
The London and Country Cook: or Accomplished Housewife The London and Country Cook: or Accomplished Housewife The London and Country Cook: or Accomplished Housewife The London and Country Cook: or Accomplished Housewife The London and Country Cook: or Accomplished Housewife The London and Country Cook: or Accomplished Housewife The London and Country Cook: or Accomplished Housewife
£475.00

Containing Practical Directions and the best Receipts In all the Branches of Cookery and Housekeeping; such as Boiling, Roasting...&c Interspersed with Many sovereign and approved Medicines used by Private Families in most Distempers; And illustrated with Forty-nine large Copper Plates. The third edition, revised and much improved by a gentlewoman; many years housekeeper to an eminent merchant in the City of London.

London: Printed for Charles Hitch. 1749.


Third edition. 8vo. 197x123mm. pp. vii, [1], 363, [1 publishers' adverts]. Engraved frontispiece, forty-nine plates including four folding. Contemporary calf, double fillet border in gilt to boards. Rebacked with red morocco label, lettered in gilt. Joints, hinges and corners strengthened. Some very slight marking. Internally very good with some browning towards the end. Overall a very nice copy of this scarce book of receipts of which ESTC records only two in the UK (BL and All Souls) and seven in the US.

Charles Carter made his name as a chef to the British generals who fought in the seemingly endless series of wars of the early eighteenth century, the Duke of Argyll most pre-eminent among them. Aside from the social advantages that such connections would have brought him, these continental adventures meant that Carter encountered more exotic ingredients and recipes than he would have done at home. He then brings these continental influences into his English dishes in a somewhat bravura manner. By all accounts, Carter was a conceited man but, as he seems to have been the in-house chef to leading members of the Whig supremacy, he probably felt that he had much to be conceited about.